Vegan Food – Trick or Treat?

Plant-based diet is all the rage but is it healthier for you? There is no argument that eating less animal products is better for your body and for the planet. For years I have been advising the general public, eating a typical North American diet, to reduce meat intake and use meat as a condiment rather than the main focus of their meal. For some, my husband included, it is easier to go cold turkey and avoid meat altogether rather than tease the taste buds and be left feeling unsatisfied. The craving for the flavor of “meat” combined with the desire to go meatless has fueled the surging popularity of meat alternatives in grocery stores and restaurants, including fast food chains.

Tricks

The plant-based food space grew 11% between 2018 and 2019 to $4.5 billion in the US which provided more options and also more confusion than ever for consumers. Have you noticed the growing number of plant-based milk, such as soy, almond, cashew, rice, and oat milks, on your grocery shelves? It can certainly be tricky to find vegan foods with the same nutritional profile as the animal products you are replacing. I recently replaced cow’s milk with almond milk and realized that I now only get 12.5% of my usual amount of protein (1 gram of protein in 1 cup of almond milk rather than 8 grams of protein in cow’s milk). That means I need to adjust my diet to eat other high protein foods to make up the deficit. Not easy to do without some nutrition knowledge and meal planning skills!

Plant-based foods designed to replace milk, cheese, and meat often have a lengthy list of ingredients and full of fillers. Have a look at the 18 ingredients in a Beyond Burger: water, pea protein isolate, expeller-pressed canola oil, refined coconut oil, rice protein, natural flavors, cocoa butter, mung bean protein, methylcellulose, potato starch, apple extract, salt, potassium chloride, vinegar, lemon juice concentrate, sunflower lecithin, pomegranate fruit powder, and beet juice extract (the beet juice give the burger its meat-like “blood”). Pretty scary! If you are interested in a complete nutritional comparison between a Beyond Burger and a regular burger, check out this article  in Good Housekeeping. It’s clear that plant-based foods can be highly processed and may not be the healthy alternative we think we are eating.

Treat

Eating a vegan or plant-based diet is not just about avoiding animal products or eating meat look-a-likes. It is about eating an abundance of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Now, that’s a treat for your health!!!

Plan the main event of your meal around “meaty” vegetables such as mushrooms, eggplant, and squash.  This will easily increase your daily vegetable servings. Consuming enough fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet reduces the risk of many chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, some cancers, and obesity. The 20152020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults consume 1.5–2.0 cup equivalents of fruits and 2.0–3.0 cups of vegetables per day. These goals are much more attainable on a plant-based diet.

The best vegan food comes in its natural form. Nuts, seeds, and legumes are never processed and provide a signifiant source of protein and fiber. Many research studies have shown that the high fiber content in some nuts and legumes is good for your gut bacteria and provides protection to the gut lining and creates a healthier microbiome. The gut microbiome plays a vital role in helping with digestion and benefiting your immune system and many other aspects of health.

Another great source of plant-based protein is whole grains.  Whole grains have much more fiber, B vitamins, and iron than refined grains. Experiment cooking with some of the high protein grains such as quinoa, spelt, kamut, amaranth and millet, just to name a few. Their names may sound intimidating but they boil a lot like rice – just follow the cooking direction on the package and you can’t go wrong. To maximum your nutrition at each meal, learn to combine grains with legumes for complementary protein.

Meat is not necessary a villain. But in a culture where meat consumption is excessive and climate change is a concern, it is definitely a treat to have the food pendulum swing in favor of vegan food.

 


How to Find the Best Spa Experience

We are not talking about the top 10 destination spas you drool over in the Travel and Leisure magazine. There is no doubt that you will get the best spa experience when you open your wallet to these top-rated spas. If not, you can probably ask for your money back. For novice spa goers, it can be confusing to know what to expect for the money you spend at a spa. Below are the three S’s to consider when choosing a spa that will give you the most bang for your buck.

Setting

The spa decor and atmosphere will set the tone for your spa experience. You can think of it as a prelude to your treatment! It doesn’t have to be an ultra luxurious space but it should be clean and give you a sense of calm. An esthetically pleasing setting will feed many senses and start your relaxation immediately. Does it have soothing colors, soft music and a pleasant scent? Even the most basic spas should provide these elements, since it is relatively inexpensive to do so . If the spa owner doesn’t have a discerning taste in creating the spa setting, I would question the calibre of their treatments and staff.

The amenities available will definitely add value and enhance your experience. Do you have access to a pool, sauna, steam room, locker room or a relaxation lounge? You can expect higher prices with more amenities, due to the cost of the spa operation. Decide what is important to you and worth the extra money. No point paying for amenities that you won’t be using. Personally, I find a comfortable relaxation lounge with tea and filtered water as a minimum to help me unwind before, and refresh after my spa treatment. Wet amenities are worth the money if you have enough time to enjoy them prior to your treatment to loosen your mind and body so you can get the most out of your treatment.

Size does not matter when it comes to sauna, steam room and whirlpool, as long as it is appropriate for the volume of traffic. My recent spa experience at LE SPA SOTHYS PARIS RÉPUBLIQUE confirmed this for me. Surprisingly, this spa only has 2 treatment rooms so it has a low volume use. The sauna, steam room and whirlpool were petite (see photo) but well-designed and provided privacy and exclusivity. Always ask for a tour of the spa to see if it brings you a sense of tranquility. Is that why we visit a spa?

Spa Services

An extensive spa menu is fun to read! I love oohing and aahing over the treatment descriptions. But if all you want is a really good deep tissue massage, too many fancy treatments on the menu may be a detractor. Just think about all the spa protocols the therapists need to learn and perform rather than focusing on delivering excellent massages. However, if you are planning a full spa day or in search of innovative spa treatments, then it’s a different story. Just like spa amenities, it is irrelevant if you are not taking advantage of the offerings.

Staff

Spa is a hospitality business so having warm, caring, and friendly staff is a must. If you don’t get that feeling when you call to make your appointment, it is likely that you will be disappointed with your overall experience. Spa therapist qualification, training and experience are most critical to the quality of the treatment. Estheticians and Massage Therapists should have professional training to properly treat the face and body, respectively; they are licensed or certified in the US. Spa industry certifications are specific to each country so be aware of varying standards and regulations, if any, when traveling to foreign countries. Do not hesitate to ask about therapists’ training and certification before you book your appointment.

To sum it up, reviewing the setting, spa services and staff at a spa will help you find the best spa experience in any country!


What to expect at your travel clinic appointment

Congratulations – You booked your flight and you’re off on your next adventure! 

Not so fast. Before you leave, take a few simple steps to stay healthy on your trip. By taking the time to understand the health risks at your destination, you’ll keep those around you healthy too. If you’ve never been to a travel clinic, here’s what to expect.

Before you go to a travel clinic

Make an appointment with your family doctor. Your primary healthcare provider and pharmacist may be able to take care of all your travel health needs, including vaccinations. If your doctor doesn’t have expertise in travel health or you need Yellow Fever vaccination, they will refer you to a travel health specialist (for example, Yellow Fever vaccination is only available from certified travel clinics). You can also book an appointment at a travel clinic if you don’t have a family doctor.

Try to book your travel clinic appointment at least 6 weeks before your trip. At busy travel clinics, it may take a week or two to get an appointment. It’s important to book early since many vaccines come in a series and need to be administered according to a specific schedule. Currently, there is also a shortage of Yellow Fever vaccine (expected to last until the end of 2019) so it may take longer to get an appointment.

A travel health specialist will provide medical advice, vaccinations, and medications based on your overall health status and your travel itinerary. They can help you prioritize vaccines if you are short on time or on a limited budget, give you tips about how to avoid common travel-related illnesses, and answer your questions about staying healthy abroad.

Before your travel clinic appointment, make sure to familiarize yourself with the health risks at your destination (our Country Health Advice tool can help). Knowing the risks can help you and your doctor make decisions together about which vaccines and medications are best suited for your trip.

What to bring to your appointment

Bring your immunization records and your detailed itinerary, including travel dates, planned activities, who you’re travelling with, and exactly where you are going – the more specific, the better. This is important because the nurse or doctor’s advice will be tailored to your health needs and the places you’re visiting. Make a list of any health conditions and medications you are taking.

During your appointment

A travel nurse or doctor will ask you detailed questions about your itinerary and your plans for the trip. Common questions include:

  • Where are you going? Which cities, towns, or rural areas are you planning to visit?
  • How long are you travelling for?
  • What is the purpose of your trip? Are you going on vacation, working, studying, volunteering, or visiting friends and relatives?
  • What type of accommodation will you be staying in (such as hotels, hostels, local homes, camping, or on a ship)?
  • What medications are you currently taking?
  • Are you up-to-date with your routine immunizations?

Many travel clinics use travel health information databases to identify local health risks, such as Rabies, Malaria, Dengue, Zika Virus, and other infectious diseases. Based on this information, your travel plans, and health status, your practitioner will identify key health risks you need to be aware of and protected from.

Vaccination is an important part of a travel clinic appointment. This is because many common travel-related illnesses are vaccine preventable. Depending on where you’re going and which vaccinations you’ve had in the past, you may get one, two, or several vaccinations during the same appointment. The majority of travel clinics are licensed to offer the Yellow Fever vaccine, which comes with a proof of vaccination certificate (here is a list of Yellow Fever centres in Canada and the United States). Common travel vaccines include Typhoid, Rabies, Japanese Encephalitis, and Hepatitis Aif not already immune. These vaccines are safe and getting vaccinated will go a long way toward keeping you healthy. However, many illnesses don’t have vaccines. For example, there is currently no Dengue vaccine for travellers. If you’re going to an area with Dengue, your travel health specialist will advise you on how to prevent mosquito bites and when to see a doctor if you suspect that you have Dengue.

Another example is Malaria. There is currently no commercially available vaccine against Malaria but there are antimalarial medications that can be used with bed nets and mosquito bite prevention measures to significantly reduce your risk of infection.

Antimalarial medications can have side effects, but there are several options available (check out our blog Malaria medication: your questions answered for more information). Your health provider can recommend the best option for you based on your health status and your destination.

No matter where you’re travelling, your travel health provider will explain how to choose safe foods and drinks, and how to reduce the risk of Traveller’s Diarrhea and Hepatitis A. The nurse or doctor may give you printed information about other health risks so you can read it at home. They may also recommend travel supplies, like a mosquito bed net if you’re visiting a place with Malaria or Japanese Encephalitis.

It’s important to give your travel health provider detailed information about your travel plans and your health status, particularly your mental health status, so that you can get the most out of your appointment. Some health and mental health conditions can be affected by travel or medication. Your provider can also give you tips and advice on managing your condition abroad and what to do in case you need a refill of your prescription, need to access a local doctor, or have a health emergency since some pre-existing conditions, including mental health, may not be covered by your insurance provider.

A note about fees: Travel clinics charge a fee for the consultation and additional fees for travel vaccines. These fees are not covered by government health plans in Canada and the United States. They may or may not be covered by private insurance. Read our Travel Vaccines on a Budget series for tips on prioritizing vaccines.

After your appointment

Go to a pharmacy to fill prescriptions from your appointment, such as antimalarial medication or antibiotics to treat severe Traveller’s Diarrhea. This is also a good time to assemble your first aid kit and refill other prescription medication.

If a mosquito bed net was recommended for your trip, you can purchase one from travel retailers or outdoor equipment stores. Box-style nets that can be tucked under your mattress offer the best protection because they keep netting (and mosquitoes) away from your skin. Bed nets treated with the insecticide permethrin provide better protection than untreated nets. (Some Canadian travel clinics sell permethrin-treated bed nets but permethrin is not currently available to consumers in Canada.)

Don’t let the precautions discourage you: Using common sense with prevention in mind is the key to a safe and healthy trip. Enjoy!

Source: International Association for Medical Assistance to Travelers

 


Truth about Turmeric

Turmeric really doesn’t need much introduction these days. For those who don’t do much cooking, it is a bright yellow spice commonly used in Indian cooking. If you are wondering what business turmeric has in finding its way into our lattes, it is because of its super food status in culinary medicine. Turmeric has potent antioxidants and anti-inflammatory effects which can potentially prevent and treat arthritis, cancer, heart disease and diabetes.  As a food enthusiast, I am no stranger to cooking with turmeric but I am curious whether drinking a cup of turmeric tea latte per day (a.k.a Golden Milk) will keep my knee pain away.

The medicinal effect of turmeric is attributed to its active compound, curcumin. It has been used to help prevent ailments for generations in Asia. Research indicates that you need to get 500 to 1,000 milligrams of curcumin per day for an anti-inflammatory effect. The average Indian diet provides around 60-100 milligrams of curcumin (2,000-2,500 milligrams of turmeric) per day. In other words, you would need to consume more than 10 times the amount of turmeric than what’s in a typical Indian diet. The truth is that it is not easy to get a therapeutic dose of curcumin without some supplementation. However, if you decide to take on the challenge with eating real food for your curcumin,  keep in mind that you will need to add at least 2 1/2 Tablespoons (17 grams) of turmeric a day in your diet to get 500 milligrams of curcumin. Also, curcumin is not easily absorbed and it needs to be combined with fat and black pepper to enhance its absorption. I am sharing my recipe of the Oven Roasted Turmeric Cauliflower that is super easy and delicious with an abundant amount of turmeric. Cauliflower is naturally high in antioxidant so this packs an extra anti-inflammatory punch.

Along with boosting curcumin in your diet to flight inflammation, it is beneficial to avoid inflammation inducing foods – sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, artificial trans fats, refined carbohydrates, processed meats, and alcohol – at the same time. This is a good way to double down on the battle against inflammation!

Cauliflower

Oven Roasted Turmeric Cauliflower

1 large head of cauliflower

1/4 cup Olive oil

2 Tbsp turmeric

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp pepper

  1. Preheat oven to 425F.
  2. Cut cauliflower into florets and put on a rimmed baking sheet.
  3. whisk olive oil, turmeric, salt and pepper in a bowl and drizzle over cauliflower to coat pieces.
  4. Roast cauliflower in oven until tender and slightly brown for 15-25 minutes, turning halfway.